Subscribe Free
in Air Transport

One in eight people willing to fly on unmanned aircraft

Posted 1 October 2018 · Add Comment

New research from Revolution.Aero, the global meeting place for people who are reshaping, rethinking and revolutionising business and personal aviation, reveals 13% of people would be prepared to fly in an unmanned aircraft. One in five men (20%) said they would do this, compared to just 6% of women.

 

18% of those aged 44 and under would be prepared to fly on an aircraft with no pilot, but this drops to 11% for those aged 55 – 64, and 8% for people who are 65 and over.

Revolution.Aero warns that with such a huge and growing shortage of pilots, unmanned commercial aircraft will have to be accepted otherwise airlines will increasingly be forced to cancel some less profitable routes.  It also warns smaller airlines could increasingly see an exodus of pilots as they are unable to compete with the salaries bigger competitors pay, which could force many of them to close routes or even stop trading all together.

The company believes advances in technology mean it’s only a matter of time before it becomes commercially viable and acceptable to have just one pilot on some flights as opposed to the mandatory requirement of two, or none at all.  Aviation rules state that passenger planes with a certain number of seats must have a minimum of two pilots in the cockpit.

Alasdair Whyte, co-founder, Revolution Aero said: “The travel industry is enjoying very strong growth, spurred on by growing middle classes around the world and falling ticket prices. The world will need up to 200,000 new pilots in the next decade, and up to 790,000 over the next 20 years to meet this growing demand and replace those pilots who have reached the mandatory retirement age, which ranges from between 60 and 65 depending where you fly in the world.

“It will be a tall order to recruit this many pilots so the aviation industry and society need to give greater consideration to pilotless commercial aircraft or more flights that just have one pilot.

“Every time an aircraft takes off it generates a huge amount of data, but only a fraction of this is used today. The aviation industry is starting to use artificial-intelligence software to better interpret that data, which leads to better maintenance practices and more efficient use of equipment, all of which bring pilotless flights ever closer.”

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

Nouvelair pace of change accelerates

Nouvelair, a Tunisian private company operating charter and scheduled flights, will celebrate its 30th anniversary in 2019. Deputy general manager, Chokri Zarrad, shared his ambition for the company with Vincent Chappard.

World Aviation Safety Summit to establish dangerous goods handling strategies

The 6th Annual World Aviation Safety Summit (WASS) will provide a focus on approaches for handling dangerous goods, organizers of the event revealed today. Hosted by the Dubai Civil Aviation Authority, WASS 2018 is set to return for its

Why the future of air travel must be digital

How will the aviation industry anticipate and respond to growing numbers of customers with changing habits and expectations? Mohammed Adnane Retmi, head of Orange Applications for Business indirect, Middle East, Africa and Russia

Apollo 15 command module pilot, Col. Al Worden, to attend Bahrain Airshow

In conjunction with the Bahrain International Airshow 2018, U.S. astronaut/scientist/inventor will address industry, military and student leaders, encouraging multilateral partnership to “break through barriers”.

Marrakech gears up for the sixth edition of the Marrakech Air Show

The sixth edition of the Marrakech Air Show, the largest African civil and military aviation event, will be held in Marrakesh between 24th and 27th of October at the Royal Air Force military base in Marrakesh.

Salalah International Airport welcomes NordWind Airlines first direct charter flight from Russia

Salalah International Airport has welcomed its first direct charter flight from Moscow Russia, coinciding with the beginning of the winter season in Dhofar (Monsoon season); starting from October to April of each year.

TAA SK0902311218
See us at
AviationShowBT1110141118AIME19BTA3005120219Aviation Africa BT0607280219BIAS BT271017161118MAPS18_BT1207131118MEBAA BT1004121218MarrakechAirshow BT2507241018GATM BT1004061118