Subscribe Free
in Air Transport

A350 engines run live for the first time ahead of maiden flight

Posted 2 June 2013 · Add Comment

Rolls-Royce's Trent XWB engines have run for the first time on the A350 XWB (MSN1) following the start-up of the auxiliary power unit (APU), as part of the preparations for the aircraft's maiden flight.

 

Combined with the A350 XWB’s lightweight structure and advanced aerodynamics, these latest generation engines with their exceptionally low fuel consumption help cut fuel burn by 25% compared to previous generation competing long-range twins.

The A350 XWB is the all-new mid-size long range product line comprising three versions and seating between 270 and 350 passengers in typical three-class layouts

The new family will bring a step change in efficiency compared with existing aircraft in this size category, using 25 per cent less fuel and providing an equivalent reduction in CO2 emissions. Scheduled for entry-into-service in second half of 2014, the A350 XWB has already won 616 firm orders from 34 customers worldwide.

Each Rolls-Royce Trent XWB-84 engine is capable of delivering 84,000 lbs thrust contributing to the outstanding economics of this aircraft. This brand new engine will offer lower fuel burn and lower emissions for improved economics and reduced environmental impact thanks to its latest technology.

The engine with its 118” diameter fan has been selected for its reduced emissions and low noise characteristics, making it community friendly and compliant with current and upcoming regulations. The Trent XWB has already close to 4.400 hours of extensive testing as well as in 75 flights with more than 250 flight hours on the A380 Flying Test Bed since its first take-off in February 2012. On 7th February 2013, the Trent XWB received its EASA certification.

 

Pictured: The first run of the engine. The white smoke that comes out of the engines during the first run of any engine is a normal occurrence following any period of storage. The smoke is generated when residual inhibiting fluid (used to protect key components during storage) burns. This is a common to all engine manufacturers. Once the inhibiting fluid has cleared the engine will be smoke-free and continue normal operation.

 

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

VIDEO: How busy is Middle East air space

Just how busy is the air space in the Middle East?

Partnerships are vital - Hogan says in Global Aerospace Summit keynote

Etihad Airways and its Abu Dhabi home-base continue to benefit from the airline's strategy of working closely with network partners which, in turn, is supporting economic growth in markets around the world, chief executive James Hogan

Mubadala, Tawazun and EAI to explore joint defence opportunities

Mubadala Development Company, Tawazun Holding and Emirates Advanced Investments (EAI) have signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) expressing their intent to explore the synergy opportunities that could be created by the

Qatar in $23bn arms order including Apache and NH90 helicopters

Qatar has added to its defence spending with the agreement to buy herlicopters from Boeing and the joint venture NH Industries as well as missiles from Lockheed Martin and Raytheon.

Thales to work with Qatar to develop optionally piloted aircraft

Thales has today signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Qatar Armed Forces to assist in the development of an Optionally Piloted Vehicle Aircraft (OPV-A), a high performance Intelligence, Surveillance, Target

Space legend Buzz Aldrin to give Global Aerospace Summit keynote address

Buzz Aldrin, the world-famous American astronaut and one of the first men to walk on the moon, will be attending the Global Aerospace Summit in Abu Dhabi as one of the keynote speakers this year.

ARINC
See us at
The Emergency Management & Crisis Response SummitMEBA 2014Aviation Outlook Middle East 2014SofexMarrakech Airshow 2014Airport Show 2014Global Airport Leaders ForumHelishow 2014Offshore & Onshore Aviation 2014